Do Professional Learning Communities Really Improve Student Achievement?

The term Professional Learning Community (PLC) is so commonplace in schools across the Nation nowadays. As you know, the literature on the topic is abundant too. Many claim that the implementation of PLCs will certainly increase student achievement. Is that really the case though? Does the empirical research actually support this argument? Perhaps. I’ll let you be the judge of that. 

To help answer the burning question, a colleague (Dr. Hector Arroyo) and I extracted 13 dissertations (from ProQuest), each of them explicitly examining whether or not PLCs have a statistically significant relationship with student achievement. The results sure were interesting too! Some PLCs were helpful in student success; others weren’t. To view a matrix summarizing all the studies, click here.

After gathering all the research–and noting some observations–we categorized all the researchers “Implications for Practice”. Three major groupings naturally surfaced. They were: (a) Understanding & Implementation, (b) Structures & Resources, and (c) Leadership. To see these groupings, along with their accompanying implications, click here.

What does all this data tell you? Will you continue to strive for becoming a true learning community?

Cheers!

Perry

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “Do Professional Learning Communities Really Improve Student Achievement?

  1. Pingback: PLCs & Their Impact on Student Achievement « WiseFoundations

  2. Pingback: WiseFoundations » Blog Archive » PLCs & Their Impact on Student Achievement

  3. I think that PLC are very effective if used ongoing and correctly. The purpose of the PLC is to provide the teacher with the neccessary tools to stay focus and committed to the learning of each student. It’s a challenge for educators but when we collobrate within our teams and develop the common assessments to identify the weakness of our students then we can build a stronger team to help our students succeed.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s